Facts & Stats

Safety belt use and crash fatality rates in Florida varied widely by county. Use the reports to find detailed information about your community.

No matter where you live, however, buckling up continues to be the single most effective way to reduce the risk of injury or death in motor vehicle crashes. Most people who die in collisions are not wearing a safety belt.

Crimes vs. Crashes (2010)

Crime 1 murder every 32.3 minutes
1 aggravated assault every 37.8 seconds
1 violent crime every 22.8 seconds
1 property crime every 3.2 seconds

Crash 1 fatality every 16 minutes
1 injury every 14 seconds
1 property damage crash every 8 seconds
1 law enforcement reported crash every 6 seconds

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5 Year Fatality History by County (2006 – 2010)

County Data
2010 Florida Traffic
Crash Statistics

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Nighttime Safety Belt Use (2010)

  • The nighttime passenger vehicle occupant fatality rate is about three times higher than the daytime rate.
  • Lowest levels are between midnight and 4 a.m.
  • Increasing safety belt usage among occupants traveling at night could substantially lessen injury and fatality rates.
  • During 2010, in Florida traffic crashes occurring at night:
  • 1,234 persons died
  • 32,982 persons were reported injured

ALL as a direct result of being UNBUCKLED

Quick Facts About Safety Belt Use in Florida

General Safety Belt Usage in Florida (2010)

  • 1,450 people were killed in vehicles equipped with safety belts.
  • 777 (54%) of these people killed were not wearing safety belts.

Safety Belt Usage by Drivers in Florida (2010)

  • 180 drivers not wearing their safety belts were killed in traffic crashes.
  • 4,803 drivers not wearing their safety belts were injured in traffic crashes.
  • 12,938 drivers involved in traffic crashes were not wearing their safety belts.
  • Drivers 15 – 19 years of age have the highest rate per 10,000 licensed drivers of crash involvement (363.97).
  • Drivers 20 – 24 years of age have the highest rate of fatal crashes per 10,000 licensed drivers (3.05).

Day and Time of Crashes in Florida (2010)

  • Friday, during the 5 p.m. hour, had the highest number of all types of crashes (2,960).
  • Sunday, during the 8:00 p.m. hour, had the highest number of fatal crashes (29).

Statewide Averages for Safety Belt Usage

2011: 88.1% 2010: 87.4% 2009: 85.2% 2008: 81.7% 2007: 79.1% 2006: 80.7% 2005: 73.9%

Safety Belt Usage in 12 Survey Counties

County 2009 2010 2011
Leon 80.6% 89.4% 89.8%
Duval 79.5% 88.9% 88.9%
Marion 85.2% 81.5% 85.7%
Pinellas 85.7% 88.5% 87.0%
Hillsborough 87.3% 85.6% 85.6%
Orange 84.3% 83.8% 85.9%
Polk 86.4% 87.1% 86.3%
Collier 91.0% 93.7% 92.1%
Broward 87.0% 87.0% 89.8%
Lee 90.0% 93.0% 92.4%
Palm Beach 87.6% 89.2% 91%
Miami Dade 87.1% 85.9% 86.5%

Safety Belt Usage by Gender

Gender 2009 2010 2012
Female 89.3% 90.7% 91.2%
Male 83.9% 84.2% 85.3%

Safety Belt Use by Race

Race 2009 2010 2011
White 88.1% 89.2% 89.4%
Hispanic 86.6% 86.6% 87.3%
Black 79.3% 81.2% 82.2%
Other 88.7% 94.1% 94.1%

Safety Belt Usage by Vehicle Type

Vehicle 2009 2010 2011
Van 88.3% 90.4% 89.9%
SUV 88.6% 89.2% 89.7%
Car 86.7% 87.7% 88.7%
Pickup 79.8% 79.9% 80.9%

NOTE: The above data was extracted from the Florida Department of Transportation 2011 Seat Belt Use in Florida Final Report


National Safety Belt Use (2010)

2010 U.S. Safety Belt Use Percentage (alphabet order)

Alabama – 91.4%
Alaska – 86.8%
Arizona – 81.8%
Arkansas – 78.3%
California – 96.2%
Colorado – 82.9%
Connecticut – 88.2%
Delaware – 90.7%
Florida – 87.4%
Georgia – 89.6%
Hawaii – 97.6%
Idaho – 77.9%
Illinois – 92.6%
Indiana – 92.4%
Iowa – 93.1%
Kansas – 81.8%
Kentucky – 80.3%
Louisiana – 75.9%
Maine – 82.0%
Maryland – 94.7%
Massachusetts – 73.7%
Michigan – 95.2%
Minnesota – 92.3%
Mississippi – 81.0%
Missouri – 76.0%
Montana – 78.9%
Nebraska – 84.1%
Nevada – 93.2%
New Hampshire – 72.2%
New Jersey – 93.7%
New Mexico – 89.8%
New York – 89.8%
North Carolina – 89.7%
North Dakota – 74.8%
Ohio – 83.8%
Oklahoma – 85.9%
Oregon – 97.0%
Pennsylvania – 86.0%
Rhode Island – 78.0%
South Carolina – 85.4%
South Dakota – 74.5%
Tennessee – 87.1%
Texas – 93.8%
Utah – 89.0%
Vermont – 85.2%
Virginia – 80.5%
Washington – 97.6%
West Virginia – 82.1%
Wisconsin – 79.2%
Wyoming – 78.9%


Myths & Facts About Safety Belt Use

Top 5 Safety Belt Myths: Busted

Myth I’d rather be thrown clear in a crash. Busted Being thrown safely clear in a crash is almost impossible. When you’re thrown, you may be thrown through the windshield, scraped along the pavement, or even crushed by your own vehicle or another one. Your best bet in a crash is to stay inside the vehicle, securely held by your safety belt.

Myth I don’t want to be trapped in a fire or underwater. Busted A fire or water submersion following a crash is an extremely rare occurrence. When they do occur, the greatest danger is actually with the impact that precedes the fire or submersion in water. Safety belts prevent injury during impact and can keep you conscious so that you can escape your vehicle.

Myth Belts can hurt you in a crash. Busted Properly worn safety belts seldom cause injuries. A safety belt may cause surface bruises, but these are generally much less severe than would have been the case without a belt. Studies have consistently shown that injuries in most serious crashes would have been much more severe had safety belts not been worn.

Myth Drivers in air bag-equipped vehicles don’t need to wear safety belts. Busted Air bags provide supplemental protection in frontal crashes, but motorists can slide under them if they are not wearing a safety belt. In addition, air bags will not help in a side or rear impact or rollover crash. Motorists should wear a safety belt at all times in order to be protected in the event of any type of crash.

Myth I’m not going far and I won’t be going fast. Busted Most crash deaths occur within 25 miles of home and at speeds of less than 40 miles per hour. This emphasizes that everyday driving from just one neighbor’s home to another, to school, to the store or just one farm to another poses the greatest danger. Always buckle up.

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